Stockholm 2007

Summer School in Sound and Music Computing

KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Stockholm, Sweden
July 2-6, 2007

This Summer School is organized by the Music Acoustics Group of the KTH in Stockholm, with the goal to promote interdisciplinary education and research in the field of Sound and Music Computing (SMC). The School is aimed at graduate students working on their Master or PhD thesis, but it is open to any person carrying out research in this field.

This is the third SMC Summer School. The first two were organized by the S2S² Coordination Action, last year it took place in Barcelona and two years ago in Genova.

Teachers

Invited
experts

Program

Application

Registration
fee

Travelling

Social
events

Venue

Teachers

Invited Experts

Academic Program

The lectures are designed to be of interest to any graduate student or researcher in the field of Sound and Music Computing. The topics chosen for this year are Neurosciences and Music and Mobile Music and Locative Audio Technology; relevant topics in our research fields which have particular methodologies and research strategies. The lectures will present these particular methodologies and their application in Music related problems.

All the participating students will give short presentations on their current research during a speed-talk of four minutes. The emphasis will be given on research questions and particularly on methodological issues related to their research project. Students will receive a written feedback from the teachers that should be useful for the continuation of their research.

All the participating students will present a poster about their PhD work. The posters will be on show for all the duration of the Summer School, with discussions during coffee breaks.

All students will work on mini-projects focusing on the themes discussed during the Summer School. Results of the mini-projects will be presented on the final day of the School. Mini-projects will give the opportunity for hands-on activities such as testing software tools or planning of experiments.

Final program schedule:

!

 
Monday 2nd
Tuesday 3rd
Wednesday 4th
Thursday 5th
Friday 6th
8:00

 

Registration

 
9:00
Neurosciences and Music

 

Elvira Brattico

Neurosciences and Music

 

Minna Huotilainen


The Future Sessions

 

The future of music: What do we need? How will it be?

 
10:00

 


Sound and Music Computing in Europe
Part 1

Current EU projects in the SMC field

 

 

11:00
Coffee break & Poster presentations
11:15
Neurosciences and Music

 

Minna Huotilainen


The Future Sessions

 

The future of music: What do we need? How will it be?

13:00
Lunch
14:30
Speed talks

 


Short 4 min presentations by students

Speed talks

 


Short 4 min presentations by students

Speed talks

 


Short 4 min presentations by students

Mini-projects final presentations by students

15:30

 

Coffee break & Poster presentations
16:00

Mini-projects final presentations by students

18:00

 

Get together drink!
 
19:00
     

Banquet

 

Neurosciences and Music

July 2nd, 9:00-11:00
Main research topics in the neurosciences of music
Elvira Brattico, PhD, Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Dept of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland
Abstract Main research topics in the neurosciences of music: modularity, musical vs. language syntax and semantics, lateralization of brain functions for music, auditory cortex plasticity, brain structures devoted to musical performance and music emotions.

July 3rd, 11:15-13:00
Methods of brain imaging research (slides in PDF)
Minna Huotilainen, PhD, Docent, researcher, Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Dept of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland

July 4th, 9:00-11:00
The development of musical abilities (slides in PDF)
Minna Huotilainen, PhD, Docent, researcher, Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Dept of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland

Mobile Music and Locative Audio Technology

Lalya Gaye, PhD, Viktoria Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden
July 2nd, 11:15-13:00
July 3rd, 9:00-11:00
July 4th, 11:15-13:00

Click here for suggested reading

Part I

Part II

Speed Talks

In a maximum of 4 slides in total (remember that you will have 4 minutes for your presentation) present your research questions/problems/crazy ideas/etc. on which you would like feedback from those present.
A printout of your slides will be available to the participants. Please notice that presentations longer than 4 slides will not be accepted!!!
Download here the powerpoint file with the instructions and the official format for the slides.

Poster presentations

Students are invited to present a poster about their research work.
Download here the powerpoint file with the instructions and the official format for the poster.

Hands-on sessions: Mini-projects

Download here the PDF file with the list of proposed mini-projects. Students can also propose alternative projects.

The Future Sessions, Thursday July 5th

 

The future of music: What do we need? How will it be?

9:00 Semi-parametric audio coding - Today and beyond (slides in PDF format)
Jonas Engdegård, Senior Research Engineer, Coding Technologies
Abstract By the time AAC (Advanced Audio Coder, the format used in e.g. iTunes music store) was standardized in 1997, the audio coding research community felt they had nearly reached the limit of how efficient a perceptual audio coder can be. However, the development of the last decade has resulted in large, unexpected improvements, mainly because of the introduction of semi-parametric audio coding tools. The by now widely spread aacPlus format, which is the successor of AAC, is based on a flexible approach of employing parametric tools such as Spectral Band Replication (SBR) and Parametric Stereo (PS) in combination with a waveform coder (AAC).
This presentation will give a quick tutorial on perceptual audio coding including an overview of how the last decade's addition of technology has contributed to today's state of the art codecs, and a future outlook in the field of audio coding.

9:40 The future of music software (slides in PDF format)
Ernst Nathorst, CEO of Propellerhead Software
Abstract Now that inexpensive computers are powerful enough to deliver a complete professional audio production and DSP can provide faithful renderings of practically any instrument we can imagine – where do we go from here? What are the next steps that music software needs to take in order to serve musicians better than today?

10:20 The future of music on mobile devices
Staffan Ljung, Strategic Product Manager for Music, Ericsson
Abstract Mobile music is arguably the most requested service by end consumers currently. The sales of mobile music has during the last 2 years had a tremendous impact on the over all digital music sales and the business is just taking its first steps out from the starting blocks.
However, we need to remember that this is still an immature business where stakeholders eventually need to adapt their business models in order to ensure market growth. In all business it would me a major mistake not to listen to what the end consumer expects wants and needs. The end user experience is a focus area where I think that most players in this segment have a lot of improvement to do. One part of the user experience is the " in-store" experience, a building brick which constantly is evolving due to a a bigger variety of choice in the stores, more professional recommendation engines, end consumer offerings etc. However the end user experience does not stop once the end consumer has bought a product from the store. Actually you could argue and say that it begins at that exact point in time. Therefore interoperability is one of the key hurdles that needs to be managed over the next years. How is this realised? What have Ericsson learnt out the past years in this area?

11:00 Coffee break

11:20 Independent music production
David Åström, Kocky/Soul Supreme
Abstract After a short presentation of the music I produce, I will discuss how modern music technology, both equipment and distribution, affects the artistic and creative process of music production. Some of the relevant issues in music production will be discussed. How is the role of the producer changing when advanced hardware and software tools are readily available to the consumer? How do different studios choose different equipment setups? How is the relationship between recording musicians and producers affected by advances in music technology?

12:00-13:00 Panel discussion

Each students will: